Jacob Christensen

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Archive for June 11th, 2008

What the Prime Minister Did NOT Say

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Excerpt (in Danish) from Anders Fogh Rasmussen’s speech at the closing debate of the Folketing earlier today:

Men samtidig betyder traktaten, at de danske undtagelser fra EU-samarbejdet i endnu større grad vil hæmme Danmarks indflydelse og interesser. Undtagelserne er bevaret uændrede i Lissabontraktaten, men virkningen af undtagelserne bliver større med den nye traktat, end de er i dag. EU-samarbejdet har jo udviklet sig betydeligt, siden vi indførte undtagelserne i 1993. Med Lissabontraktaten vil der være store dele af samarbejdet, som vi ikke kan være med til.

Danmark vil være afskåret fra at deltage i EU’s indsats for at skabe og bevare fred. Vi kan ikke deltage i EU’s indsats for at skabe sikkerhed i verdens brændpunkter, som f.eks. Bosnien. Og Danmark vil være afskåret fra at deltage i det fælles politisamarbejde, herunder bekæmpelse af international terrorisme, bekæmpelse af grænseoverskridende kriminalitet, som f.eks. handel med kvinder og børnepornografi.

Derfor er undtagelserne i direkte modstrid med danske interesser. Tiden er løbet fra undtagelserne. De skader Danmark.

Regeringens holdning er meget klar: Danmark skal være fuldt og helt med i Europa. Vi deler grundlæggende værdier om frihed, menneskerettigheder og demokrati. Vi skal være med til at løse de fælles problemer. Det er i vores bedste interesse.

Derfor gjorde regeringen det allerede i november sidste år klart, at vi i denne valgperiode vil bede vælgerne om at tage stilling til EU-undtagelserne ved folkeafstemning.

Dansk Institut for Internationale Studier offentliggør sidst på måneden en grundig udredning om de danske undtagelser. På den måde vil alle få adgang til grundig og veldokumenteret information i god tid, inden vi skal træffe beslutning.

Regeringen vil bruge sommeren til at overveje redegørelsen fra Dansk Institut for Internationale Studier. I begyndelsen af august vil det så være naturligt at tage stilling til, hvornår og hvordan en afstemning bedst kan finde sted.

He explicitly mentioned Security and Defence Policy as well as Home and Judicial Affairs in his speech, but not the EMU. I haven’t found any reference to monetary policy in the speech – I will try and read the debate when it is available to see if the other parties will force AFR to make a statement on the issue. An announcement of the date(s) for referendum(s) will be made in early August.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 5:39 pm

Posted in Politics

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Business

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Amanda Goodall on academic management (pdf):

By constructing a new panel data set, the paper shows — in figures such as Figure 1 and tables such as Table 7 — that the characteristics of a leader in position today are correlated with the future performance of the organization. This appears to be the first longitudinal evidence that the appointment of a university president who has been a successful researcher can improve the later research performance of their university. It suggests that where the workforce are predominantly experts and professionals, it is specialists, not generalists, who should lead.

According to the Times Higher Education, this was Universities UK’s response (my italics):

Universities are highly complex businesses with an average annual turnover of more than £100 million and are now operating in an increasingly competitive global market.

Historically, having an academic background has always been important. The reality is that nowadays vice-chancellors are required to have a whole range of skills in order to be effective leaders in what is a highly successful sector.

And in case you wonder, this discussion is also linked with the Blair government’s management drives in the UK.

HT: Forskerforum.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 4:57 pm

60 Seconds

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60 seconds of Steve Jobs:

60 (well, 73) seconds of Steve Ballmer:

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 3:15 pm

Posted in Spare time

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Sympathies

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The centre-right in Sweden still has massive problems according to SCB’s twice-yearly party sympathy poll. Compared with November’s poll the Social Democrats are down a point but the loss is off-set by gains for the Green Party.

One thing I like about the SCB polls is that they include voter flows. Note how the Liberals and the Greens receive votes:

Source: SCB.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 2:30 pm

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links for 2008-06-11

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Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 2:30 pm

Posted in delicious.com

Ireland

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Henry Farrell has been busy and provides us with two posts about the Irish referendum on Thursday. The Crooked Timber piece is more or less a summary of the campaign (which in many ways appears to have been pretty unfocused on both sides) while the Monkey Cage post discusses Andrew Moravcik’s understanding of the need (or lack thereof) for legitimising the EU. (HF is sceptical of AM, in case you are curious).

I’ll just steal this from the Monkey Cage post and ask if this would also apply to Denmark (remember that if the Lisbon Treaty passes the Irish referendum, then we are looking at one or more referendums in Denmark in the near future) and Sweden:

Given the difficulties encountered by both the pro-EU argument for legitimation through more democracy, and Moravcsik’s more limited functionalist approach, is there any alternative? My first approximation argument is that there is. As Moravcsik says, there are relatively few salient fundamental cleavages in politics, and European integration isn’t one of them. Thus, the inherent disorganization of the debate in referendums, where you get one side composed of European elites convinced that Europe is a matter of obligation and destiny, the other side a discordant clatter of contrary viewpoints, and voters not quite sure what to do with either set of claims.

The alternative is to recast European policies in the light of traditional cleavages, the most obvious one being the cleavage between left and right. Europe has, to date, been the matter of consensus between center left and center right. But there are very different ways in which politics might be organized on the European level, depending on your attachment to the traditional models of left and right. The left has traditionally favoured a variety of national institutions designed to protect individuals against the vagaries of markets, the right (with some variations) has been more attached in recent decades to free market policies. European policies have clear implications for the feasibility of both, depending on which specific policies are chosen.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 1:47 am

Posted in Politics

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A Baseball Game, Not a Horse-Race

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FiveThirtyEight, run by Nate Silver. Duly added to my Google Reader under “Politics“.

Via Bitch PhD.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 12:52 am

Posted in Politics

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Less Badly

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Die Zeit said it (at least in the rss-version of the summary): The Swedes played less badly than the Greeks and won 2-0.

If the Swedes hadn’t had Ibrahimovic…

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 11th, 2008 at 12:41 am

Posted in Spare time

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