Jacob Christensen

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Archive for June 4th, 2008

Class and Lack Thereof (II)

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Correction: Britain is not just a class-based society. It is also an authoritarian class-based society.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 4th, 2008 at 10:14 pm

Posted in Politics

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Dangers of the Internet

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Hm – perhaps I ought to use my .eu-domain instead? According to McAffee’s SiteAdvisor test, the .name top level domain has 4,4% bad sites. That is almost as bad as the TLD for Russia.

If you’re curious, the test for this site is here and as you can see, you’re pretty safe with me.

Oh and set up your firewall and get antivirus software, even if you run OSX.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 4th, 2008 at 5:32 pm

Posted in General

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Class and Lack Thereof

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I would just want to point out to this dick-headed upper-class moron that my aunt a) has a working-class background and b) is a doctor.

But then again: Is it really surprising to be reminded of the fact that the UK still is a class-based and not an egalitarian or even meritocratic society?

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 4th, 2008 at 5:20 pm

Posted in Politics,Spare time

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Spies Like Us

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Does anybody remember H.C. Hansen these days? He belonged to the same generation as Tage Erlander (but unlike Erlander never had an academic education), was the #2 man of the Danish Social Democrats for most of the 1940s and early 1950s and following the early death of Hans Hedtoft in 1955 he became prime minister only to die from cancer at the age of 53 in 1960.

Hansen is best remembered for – well, what is he remembered for? In a way, he was the Helmut Schmidt to Hans Hedtoft’s Willy Brandt, the doer rather than the visionary, occupied with keeping the machines of the party moving, and it is difficult to link Hansen’s name to any big project or policy decision. Unlike their Swedish brethren, the Danish Social Democracy for a number of reasons did not have a sk÷rdetid (harvest) in the 1950s.

But nearly fifty years after his death, Hansen is in the news with a story about his collaboration with US intelligence during and immediately after the Second World War.

Surprising? Yes and no. That the US would have some interest in Denmark during and after the war is pretty obvious and it is also an old story that US intelligence services had contacts to non-communist leftist movements. H.C. Hansen had contacts to the Danish Resistance movement as well as a central position in the Social Democratic party and as such, he would be a useful contact for the Americans.

What may be slightly surprising is that Hansen at a very early stage had close contacts with the Americans and not the British.1 It took some years for the Danish political elite to really grasp the central role of the US in the post-WW2 world, so Hansen would in fact have been remarkable prescient by having US contacts. That Hansen and others would keep the US informed about Danish-Soviet negotiations over a trade treaty is not really earth-shattering news.

It is an established truth that the main interest of the US with regard to Denmark was getting access to Greenland. If we leave aside the the legal niceties, the interesting question would be if H.C. Hansen’s contacts with the US left Denmark in a better or worse position with regard to defence and alliance policies.

  1. Here we should note that US archives are more open that UK archives. []

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 4th, 2008 at 4:53 pm

Posted in Politics

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How to Lose the Nomination

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William Douglas of McClatchy tells us.

As Clinton fell short of the presidential nomination, a number of campaign staffers and confidants close to the New York senator offered a postmortem on a campaign that started with $133 million war chest but ended millions in the red, that won the big state primaries but scoffed at delegate-rich caucus contests, that didn’t have a Plan B after the Feb. 5 Super Tuesday contests failed to secure her nomination, that misread a country’s mood and underestimated her young, upstart rival and his message of change.

Specifically on the caucuses (my emphasis):

The switch in managers, however, was unable to overcome what some Clinton staffers called perhaps the campaign’s most egregious blunder: dismissing the caucus states.

The Clinton camp thought that caucuses were attended by an elite few Democrats who didn’t reflect the will of regular voters. Obama, on the other hand, had a caucus strategy that helped him rack up delegates.

“They kept pooh-poohing them, Ickes and (Clinton campaign chairman Terry) McAuliffe,” the campaign insider said. ” ‘Caucus states don’t represent the people.’ Hell, they had delegates, didn’t they?”

The most damaging caucus state was Iowa, the insider said, because Obama’s victory in a predominantly white state convinced African-American voters who were still deciding between Obama and Clinton that he could win the nomination.

Written by Jacob Christensen

June 4th, 2008 at 5:51 am

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